Mass Spectrometry

Mission

The mission of Northwestern Proteomics is to develop new proteomics technologies, to apply them to timely questions in basic, translational and clinical research, and to educate researchers throughout the Chicagoland area and communicate our research findings to the scientific community at large.

At Northwestern Proteomics, we're committed to providing the best proteomics research on a budget.  We're scientists first, so we will work with you to review each project as it comes in and offer consultation to ensure that everyone's expectations are managed.  That way, the experiment that we perform has the best chance for success.  Proteomics is not a simple technique; so we're both a University Research Center and service-oriented core, handling multiple projects large and small.

Within the Northwestern Proteomics core facility, we offer multiple types of experiments from simple protein identification to protein quantitation (both relative and absolute).  We also perform both traditional bottom-up proteomics, where proteins are digested with an enzyme prior to analysis and intact, top-down proteomics analyses.  The ability to perform top-down proteomics within our core facility distinguishes from many other proteomics cores across the world.

How do you start work with us? 

  • If it’s your first time performing proteomics, we should sit down and chat about your system and the questions that you want to answer.  The diversity of method for proteomics can be overwhelming and we’re happy to help narrow down the best experiment for you.  The first step is to go to our Northwestern Proteomics website (http://proteomics.northwestern.edu) and submit a Collaboration Request.  Someone will be in touch to schedule an in-person or telephone conference.
  • If you’ve worked with us before and already know what you want, head over to our Northwestern Proteomics website and fill out a Sample Submission Form.  Once that’s completed, drop off your sample at either of our dropoff locations Monday through Thursday 8:30-5:00pm and Friday 8:30-12:00pm. 

Drop Off Locations

            Chicago: Olson 8305
            Evanston: Silverman B550

Atom Probe Tomography (APT) produces a three-dimensional (3D) atom-by-atom image of a sample, with sub-nanometer spatial resolution and a typically 150 x 150 x 500 nm^3 analyzed volume, by simultaneous high resolution imaging and time of flight mass spectrometry. APT is particularly suited to study nano or nanostructured materials. The same samples can also be characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), in a correlative study. To compare these experimental results with atomistic simulations on the same size scale, ab-initio calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations can be performed at our facility. NUCAPT operates a CAMECA LEAP 4000 XSi tomograph. Specimen tips can be prepared by electropolishing (metals) and from almost any material by FIB ( Focused-ion beam milling ). Ion beam sputter deposition creates thin film structures that aid with APT specimen preparation. Vacuum arc melting systems are available for syntesizing alloys and compounds. Thermocalc and MEDEA software packages are available for thermodynamic calculations and materials simulations.  For more information about this facility, click here.

The Quantitative Bio-element Imaging Center (QBIC) provides researchers with access to state-of-the-art imaging and quantification instrumentation while supporting its use with an expert technical staff that offers a range of services, including instrument training, sample preparation and analysis, experiment design, and grant proposal assistance.  The combination of both extremely high sensitivity elemental analysis and high resolution imaging enables QBIC customers to perform cutting edge experiments with ample staff support. For more information about this facility, click here. 

 

IMSERC

The Integrated Molecular Structure Education and Research Center (IMSERC) facility performs a full range of chemical analyses. Such analyses include qualitative composition determination, quantitative analysis, and molecular structure determination.  The most commonly used techniques are NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, trace metals analysis and single crystal X-Ray crystallography. For more information about this facility, click here.

ChemCore

The Medicinal and Synthetic Chemistry Core (ChemCore) provides synthetic chemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry and molecular modeling services. For more information about this facility, click here.