Tissue & Animal Phenotyping Cores

The Behavioral Phenotyping Core (BPC) helps investigators examine their mice and rats for changes in behavior. BPC's mission is to make available to funded research projects a facility to determine the behavioral effects of genetic manipulations, potential pharmaceuticals, aging, and other manipulations upon normal behavior, and the learning and memory capacities of rodents used as model systems. We can also work with PIs needing to gather pilot data. For more information about this facility, click here.

Individuals wishing to use the BPC are encouraged to contact Dr. Craig Weiss during the design stage of the project. 

The selection of animal strain, age and gender should be considered carefully.  Contact Dr. Weiss to discuss  selections.  For a discussion of gender differences affecting research with humans see: http://www.womenshealth.northwestern.edu/research

On-line reservation calendar: The BPC has multiple assays in the same room and even multiple assays in the same chamber.  This arrangement maximizes flexibility and efficiency within our limited space, but it precludes the use of an on-line reservation calendar.  Scheduling is done by emailing either Mary Kando (Mary.Kando@northwestern.edu) or Dr. Weiss (cweiss@northwestern.edu). 

More

Stem Cell Core Facility Lab at Northwestern

The stem cell core facility was founded in 2009 by Dr. Jack Kessler, Ken and Ruth Davee Professor of Stem Cell Biology at the Feinberg School of Medicine. This was immediately after President Obama signed an executive order repealing a policy that limited federal tax dollars for embryonic stem (ES) cell research and the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by Shinya Yamanaka. Being a long-time enthusiast of human stem cell research and one of the pioneers in the field at Northwestern University, Dr. Kessler foresaw the growing interest of basic researchers and medical doctors in this rapidly developing and highly promising research area.

The mission of the stem cell core facility is to engage scientists at Northwestern University and the greater Chicago Biomedical Consortium and enable them to do stem cell-based research. The facility is currently funded by an NIH P30 grant and Feinberg School of Medicine.

The facility is situated on the 10th floor of the Lurie research building (#10-232). It encompasses approximately 800 square feet of lab space that is perfectly equipped to allow for the culture of human ES and iPSCs. It offers technical support in basic culturing techniques of human ES and iPS cells, including focused training sessions; it provides lab space and equipment for researches that want to engage in stem cell-based projects; it generates iPSCs through a range of different techniques; as well as providing general consulting and support for iPSC-based disease modeling projects.
 

More

The goal of the Northwestern University SDRC is to promote outstanding bench and clinical research in cutaneous biology, ultimately to improve patient care. The SDRC is comprised of an Administrative Core and three distinct Research Cores which include the Skin Tissue Engineering Core (previously the Keratinocyte Core, the Morphology & Phenotyping Core (previously the Pathology Core) and the DNA/RNA Delivery Core. These core facilities are designed to help SDRC investigators accomplish their research goals related to cutaneous biology and to provide a level of support to newly recruited junior investigators who are interested in skin research. The Cores strive to provide all SDRC users with access to specialized techniques, expertise, biological analysis and instrumentation that enhances research progress. To read the OR Newsletter article on SDRC, click here.

For additional information on this facility visit the SDRC website  here.


 
SDRC Administrative Office:
Ward #9-132, 303 E. Chicago Ave. 
Admin Phone: 312-503-1815 

 

SDRC Lab:
Tarry #4-750, #4-753, 303 E. Superior St.
Lab Phone: 312-503-4407

 

More

The  Pathology Core Facility (PCF) of Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center (RHLCCC) at Northwestern University is established in 1997.  PCF is functionally divided into three divisions/units, including core lab, biorepository and clinical trials unit.  Core lab includes all related tasks of routine histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular work, and digital pathology (all aspects of a research-based anatomic pathology laboratory including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, automated and manual immunohistochemistry, tissue microarray design and construction, and automated whole slide scanning for digital pathology applications, including advanced image analysis capabilities). Biorepository division includes tissue and biospecimen procurement (a workflow that complements clinical patient care, the consent procedures which include statement of basic, translational and clinical research and PDX studies for potential therapies), detailed sample annotation (pre-analytic variables such as cold post-surgery time, frozen section evaluation, specimen tracking, and a quality management program); and well-controlled biospecimens and procedures (ensuring that clinically meaningful and reproducible data emerge from investigation). The clinical trials unit (CTU) provides service of institution, regional and national network and prepares trial cases of fast turnaround time and high quality trial materials and patients’ satisfaction. In conjunction with the Cancer Center’s Clinical Trials Office, the clinical trials unit participates in both industry based clinical trials and investigator initiated clinical trials. 

More

The Mouse Histology and Phenotyping Laboratory (MHPL) is designed to assist investigators with their research histology needs, as well as gross and histological characterization of genetically modified murine models. Studies can be performed on individual organs or involve a systemic overview of all major organ systems. Pathologist consultation will allow the development of strategies to elucidate the phenotype and gain mechanistic insight regarding the biologic actions of the targeted molecule. For more information about this facility, click here.

MHPL Homepage

More